Sunday, July 26, 2009

Day 2 At Sea
















This morning we were engulfed in a very dense fog bank… Bummer! Not to despair, just because the Captain couldn’t see where we were going doesn’t mean that good old Mr. Sun can’t peek through the clouds. It turned out to be a very, very nice day. It even cleared up totally at one point. I couldn’t believe it; I stopped reading, turned around and discovered that I wasn’t the only one there anymore. I had a full day planned for tomorrow, I booked two tours….but, got back to my cabin and they cancelled one. Don’t you just love last minute cancellations? It gives you no time to re-plan your day… HAL could improve this a bit….. Tomorrow I will be doing a ship’s tour (But only one!!!!) and here is the description: Havre-Aux-Maisons Island Highlights
This tour shows visitors around Havre-aux- Maisons Island with stops at a local artist's studio and a look at one of the area's traditional industries. Havre-aux-Maisons Island is remarkable for its bare landscape; the scarcity of trees is due to extensive lumbering during the last century. The island's smooth landscape stands out sharply against its worn red cliffs. Havre-aux- Maisons, located on one of the most beautiful islands of the archipelago, has a sweet rural character with winding roads and houses scattered about the countryside. The tour begins at Verrie La Méduse, a glass-blowing studio located in a heritage building called the old St-Joseph School where visitors may observe glass-blowers at work, transforming silica into magnificent works of art. The smoked herring economuseum, Fumoir d’Antan, a typical smokehouse, brings to life this last vestige of what was once a very important industry. This smokehouse has been used for three generations to smoke herring, mackerel, salmon and scallops. Chemin Pointe-Basse is a road peppered with many examples of traditional local architecture: houses and barns are quite simple and painted in a variety of bright colours. The Acadian and French origins of many of the Islanders, as well as some New England influences are reflected in the architecture of their homes. Several details are typical of the traditional home: the small enclosed porch, corbel, veranda, and painted or stained cedar shingles. Cap-Alright Lighthouse offers a spectacular view over grey cliffs, all of Plaisance Bay and the outline of Entry Island. The lighthouse is the last one built on the Islands, and it has changed little since its construction in 1928. The roadside rest area at Dune-du-Sud gives access to a beautiful beach. Red cliffs sculpted by the sea shelter one side of the beach. There are lots of holes and caves to explore. Just a little update…. Last night was our first formal night and the Captain’s Welcome; nice evening! I met Captain Andre van Schoonhoven and he seems like a great guy. I continued to run into old friends…going well so far.

5 comments:

Jennie said...

Jeff,

Am looking forward to reading your Blog each day. I love cruising through your eyes. Enjoy this cruise, we did it back in 2005 on the Maasdam. It was a cold weather cruise though and I am not sure how you will survive without the sunshine!!

Jennie

Anonymous said...

Looking good "Tan Man" but then so are Rita & Colin. Thought they were not getting on 'till you reached the other part of Canada...
Enjoy using those Canadian $$$$$.

>>>>>>>>> Dad (AKA Ian)

Michelle and Rudy van der Goot said...

So, how are the deck chairs?

Mary said...

Glad everything started well. Did the luggage you shipped arrive safely? Enjoy.

allan said...

Once again the photo's are magnificant. Tha Captain Andre is one of the best. Please give him our best. happy days's Allan